Lonestar3, San Antonio, 2013

Posted in Appearances.

It’s just occurred to me that I won’t actu­ally be home for the release day of Cast in Sorrow.

I’ll be in San Antonio, for the Worldcon. And this is what I’ll be doing there, offi­cially:

Kaffeeklatsch

Thursday 14:00 — 15:00

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Best Prac­tices from Book­sellers

Thursday 21:00 — 22:00

Our experts discuss hand selling, commu­nity-building, and other tips and tricks for new authors.

Gini Koch (M), Michelle Sagara, Michael J. Walsh, Peggy Hailey, Lawrence Person

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Stroll with the Stars Friday

Friday 09:00 — 10:00

Neil Clarke, Brenda Cooper, Ellen Datlow, Michelle Sagara, Bobbie DuFault, Gay Haldeman, Joe Haldeman, John Berlyne, Paul Cornell, Scott Edelman

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Reading

Saturday 13:00 — 14:00

(I have 50 minutes! I am already trying to decide what to read)

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The Shift from Print Publishing to E‑Publishing

Saturday 16:00 — 17:00

The accep­tance of (and enthu­siasm for) elec­tronic publi­ca­tion has increased dramat­i­cally in the past two years. E‑book sales are up, and fans are replacing phys­ical books with elec­tronic copies. Where are we in this tran­si­tion, and what is the prog­nosis for the next two to five years?

Kirsten Gong-Wong (M), Michelle Sagara, John Klima, Betsy Mitchell, Hugh Howey

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The Enduring Popu­larity of Firefly

Saturday 17:00 — 18:00

Firefly lasted one short season, yet it has a very enthu­si­astic fan base, that wants to talk about it, watch it, and hope for more.

Michelle Sagara (M), Ginjer Buchanan, Kate Baker, Steven Brust, Selina Rosen

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But is it Science Fiction?

Sunday 11:00 — 12:00

Why do some reviewers, authors, and acad­e­mics seem to confuse the sub-genre of space opera with the entire field of science fiction? What do main­stream authors miss when they write SF without being aware of what’s already been written? How can SF authors gain cred­i­bility in wider literary circles, or is it even impor­tant to do so?

Daryl Gregory (M), Adam Troy Castro, Nancy High­tower, Michelle Sagara, Gary K. Wolfe

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Auto­graphing: Charles E. Gannon, Michelle Sagara, Rachel Swirsky, Sheila Williams

Sunday 14:00 — 15:00

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As You Know, Jim…

Sunday 15:00 — 16:00

Expo­si­tion is never easy. How can writers commu­ni­cate the details of a setting, magical system or incred­ible scien­tific break­through without losing half their audi­ence? What makes a readers eyes glaze over and how do you avoid it?

Michelle Sagara (M), Tanya Huff, Karl Schroeder, Jack McDe­vitt, Walter Jon Williams

14 Responses to Lonestar3, San Antonio, 2013

  1. Tanja says:

    Sorry to miss the con — hope it goes well and you all have fun!
    I pre-ordered your book, so I’m hoping I’ll be doing some reading at around that time… :)

  2. Chris G. says:

    Sounds like an inter­esting and wide-ranging collec­tion of panels (though I’ve never been to a Con with panels, so maybe it’s normal?).

    In any event, I hope that you enjoy what­ever you decide to read and have an enjoy­able and produc­tive time overall.

  3. Hilda says:

    I imagine that when you attend a few of these confer­ences is because you get some enjoy­ment out of them, and get to meet some of your fans. You prob­ably get some ideas for your craft, although I think in your case is much more giving to younger writers and listeners. SF writing is your job, like mine was legal writing. One confer­ence topic interest me. How people are turning to e‑reading more than books. I have been carrying books for years and years, home to home. Thou­sands. Some I donated. A year ago, I finally moved from a very large home to prob­ably my last and smaller home. I had thou­sands of books; all read one time and hoping to read at least once more. Donated dozens of boxes with a heavy heart. Reality is that, with very few excep­tions, they were read just once. I have only read yours more than once, but also you have so much I could read that it was only a month or so ago that I bought another author’s book (Dan Brown’s Inferno). I absolutely love books since I was a child; every time I opened a book, it was like trav­eling into an unknown world full of people. I was given a Nook; but holding it in my hands absolutely can not compare with holding a real book. I got some of yours that were not avail­able in book format.I think kids now a days will never get to discover the plea­sure feeling of what is hiding between the covers of a new book. But maybe what they will come to love is what is hiding in a blank screen

  4. Ralph says:

    Unless life throws me another curve­ball, I hope to attend Lonestatr3.I want second every­thing Hilda said. That panel inter­ests me also. Growing up, there was no toy or present that could compare with a book. I still remember the very first book I was given as a present. It was Jack London’s Call of the Wild. I was in the third grade. I hid behind our living room couch and read it cover to cover. My family thought I had run away because no one could find me.
    That feel of a new book is inde­scrib­able! I sincerely hope this E‑book gener­a­tion will enjoy that same feeling from a screen. I have purchased Michelle’s books in paper and elec­tronic. More to support Michelle, but with the aware­ness of the space limi­ta­tion that is rapidly approaching.

  5. Hilda says:

    My first book was a book of legends with pictures of incred­ible people and animals. From there, I quickly went to all the legends of the world. By 10 I was writing my own legends which enter­tained my family a lot. I don’t go anywhere without a book in my hands.
    My dentist 2 weeks ago asked me about Michelle Sagara’s books.

  6. michelle says:

    True confes­sion: I love phys­ical books, still, because that’s what I grew up reading, and books were a large, large part of my life.

    But…I love ebooks because my father, whose eyesight has never, ever been good, can read them — he just adjusts the font size in the iPad so the font is very large. It means he can read what­ever he likes without having to cart around a magni­fying glass, because Large Type books aren’t all that common.

    My sons read phys­ical books, in part because I haven’t been able to interest them in iPads, and possibly because the books they’ve seen me read are phys­ical books.

  7. michelle says:

    Unless life throws me another curve­ball, I hope to attend Lonestatr3.

    If you do make it, make sure you intro­duce your­self :D. (I assume you’ll also be busy with panels & friends, etc., while you’re there :))

  8. easyreader says:

    I have been known to bring books to parties, just on the off chance that I get a moment to read. I currently own a Nook, a Kindle and an ipad and still buy hard­cover and paper­back books.
    I have pre ordered Cast in Sorrow for my Kindle, but intend to stop at the book­store on the way home and buy the book as well. I have been reading since the age of 4 and do not intend to stop until I no longer compre­hend what is happening. To para­phrase Charlton Heston, they will have to pry my books from my cold, dead hands.

  9. Kat says:

    I live in Melbourne and I got a call from my book­shop. It’s here! So exciting, I have never got it on release day (earlier really given time zones). It usually takes a couple of weeks. I’m giddy with antic­i­pa­tion! Can’t wait for work to finish so I can go grab it.

  10. Joey says:

    Hope you have a fun and happy time! I won’t be there as I opted to go to World Fantasy Con instead this year.

  11. controuble says:

    It was wonderful seeing you again and meeting M. Finally finishes Cast in Sorrow a couple days ago — loved it! Now waiting for Touch and/or Oracle.

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