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    • michelle

      Living Room Etiquette   07/25/17

      Welcome to my living room on the internet.   Let me talk a little bit about the history of my home on the internet. I started out blogging on LiveJournal, which is a blogging community. And I talked about publishing and process, but in a fairly general way.   And that worked for a number of years.   What I almost never talked about was my books. But over time, people found my LJ, and they wanted to talk about my books, and I felt a little self-conscious talking about my books on LiveJournal, where the community was more general and more social, and talking about my books felt a little conspicuously like shouting: Me Me Me!   So: I started my author web-site. I posted sample chapters. I talked--when I had any news--about my books. I didn't post often, because I didn't want to drive people who came to the web-site purely for news or information away.   And that seemed to work.   But a funny thing happened. I'm not, and have never been, Robert Jordan, George Martin or Patrick Rothfuss in terms of my reach. I don't have the kind of buzz they generate, and I'm fine with that. I'm not Misty Lackey or Melanie Rawn, either.   I write my books. I try not to say too much about them, because some people hate spoilers. I try not to complain too much about the process, because every job anywhere is difficult sometimes. But… I can't really talk about my books as if I were a reader, because I can't ever approach them as a reader would for the first time. Or even the twentieth.   And sometimes people want to talk about the experience of reading my books. But given my general invisibility on fantasy reader radars, they haven't found many places in which they can do that.   A few years ago, my readers began to talk to each other - on my web-site, because they found people who were also interested in talking about my books there. On a release-day post about the latest novel. This made some readers unhappy because of course discussing the books meant spoilers. I then made a separate SPOILER thread, which people could easily avoid.   That worked, and I made a spoiler thread for almost every subsequent book.   So readers who wanted to discuss the book with other readers spoke to each other on the spoiler threads. I stay out of the spoiler threads. I stay out of the discussions about my books. And I've been able to do that because, while people don't always agree, they don't descend into acrimony and flames.   But the spoiler thread for Cast in Peril was 369 comments long. And that's a lot of comments, and possibly a long load time.   And I thought: maybe it's time to try forums.   I wouldn't have considered forums at all if the spoiler threads had descended into invective and angry ranting; they never have. The people who post and discuss on them have been helpful and reasonable, even when they don't agree with each other.   And what I want out of forums is for that to continue. I don't expect my forums to be crowded; I don't expect that they'll need to be moderated or policed, because of the history of the readers who have posted on my web-site.   But forums in general have rules and policies, and it's best to be clear about those up front, in case of future need. So.   The Living Room rules:   1. Since it's my Living Room, there's a strong possibility that children and grandmothers will stroll past or stop in, since both frequent my house. So I'd ask you to keep that in mind when it comes to profanity. Swear as much as I do.   2. Door to door salesmen frequently interrupt social gatherings, and they're not there to join the discussion. So: don't be that person. This isn't a tupperware party, and I don't want anyone to attempt to sell things to my visitors. If you notice that someone is advertising cheap watches or winning lottery numbers or any variant thereof, report it - and ignore it. It'll be cleaned up and swept out the door.   3. No flaming. Which is to say: no personal attacks or insults. I don't expect this will be a problem because it hasn't been - and I'd really like that to continue. Also, and this is a personal thing: don't accuse someone of trolling just because they disagree with you. Sometimes people disagree; they're not doing it to enrage or derail.   4. Things NOT to discuss on these forums: Real-world religions (any). Real-world politics (any). Explicit sexuality (because: children & grandmothers. And, to be fair, me). There are many other places to discuss any of these things - and I ask that you discuss them there. Here is not the place. This is possibly the only thing I'll be draconian about.   If, in the opinion of the management, you break these rules, we'll probably ask you to sit out the topic. If you break these rules more than once, we may ask you to sit out the week. If you can't communicate without breaking these rules, this is not the forum for you; there are lots of forums on the internet that will be more to your liking.   Also: I believe that readers should be able to discuss what they want to discuss, even if what they want to discuss is how a particular book I've written didn't work for them. For obvious reasons, I would like to personally avoid those discussions because I don't want to be a damper, and because it's not possible for me to be consistently objective about my own work. It's not entirely possible to avoid these discussions on the web-site; on the forums it will be. I've asked Tchula Ripton to moderate, as she's been the list-mom on the Yahoo West list for a number of years.   So on those parts of the forum where the discussions are about my works, she wears the big hat where necessary, because I'm not there.   As for the forums: any member can create topics, and any member can read any forum and reply there. If, for instance, you want to get people's opinions on ebook readers, you can start a post in the “Random†category, and ask.
Ehtiar

Miyazaki Hangs Up His Hat

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Ehtiar    106

BBC News - Miyazaki Hangs Up His Hat

 

 


Japanese director Hayao Miyazaki, who won an Oscar for his 2001 animated film Spirited Away, is set to retire.

 

The 72-year-old's animation studio announced the news at the Venice Film Festival on Sunday.

Koju Hoshino, president of Studio Ghibli, said Miyazaki's latest project, The Wind Rises, would be his last film.

 

The director is also known for his movies Princess Mononoke, Howl's Moving Castle and Ponyo.

Mr Hoshino declined to take questions on Miyazaki's decision to retire, but said more details would be given next week at another press conference in Tokyo.

 
Spirited Away told the story of Chihiro, a 10-year-old girl who is whisked away to a spirit world "He wants to say goodbye to all of you," he said.

 

Miyazaki was not in Venice for the international premiere of The Wind Rises, which is showing in competition.

The director's 11th feature film tells the story about the engineer who designed Japan's World War II fighter planes.

Miyazaki - who is one of the most respected directors in animation - first came to prominence in the 1970s with his work in anime for TV.

 

He previously retired after the release of 1997 film Princess Mononoke, but returned to direct Spirited Away to great acclaim.

Howl's Moving Castle followed in 2004, and was nominated for a best animated feature Oscar.

In recognition of his five-decade career, he was awarded the Golden Lion for lifetime achievement at the Venice Film Festival in 2005.

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Tchula    16

Well, if anyone deserves a wonderful retirement, it's him.  I really want to see his newest movie, The Wind Rises.  My favorite Miyazaki film is Howl's Moving Castle.  He will be missed, definitely.

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michelle    51

I'd like to see that, too. But I like to listen to the original audio voices, so I usually wait >.> 

 

No, I can't understand most of what anyone actually says - the single exception being Totoro, which is mostly the language children use. While I was in Australia, I did see a movie that people compared to Miyazaki - but I found the comparison superficial on watching (it's Children Who Chase Lost Voices, or alternately, Children Who Chase Lost Voices from Deep Below).

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Tchula    16

Children Who Chase Lost Voices is a Makoto Shinkai film.  I haven't seen it, but I did see The Place Promised in Our Early Days, which was not that great imo.  The pacing was slow, and I found it boring overall, though I know many people rate it highly.

I want to see Garden of Words, which is airing on AnimeNetwork right now.  Maybe I'll check it out tonight.  I'd also like to see 5 Centimeters Per Second as well, then I can decide if I actually like Shinkai's work.

 

I'd really like to see Up on Poppy Hill, by Goro Miyazaki.  The Secret World of Arietty was beautifully animated, but the plot was fairly simple and not that interesting.  It must be hard to live up to his dad's success.  I don't envy him the task.

 

My favorite anime filmmaker is Satoshi Kon; I loved all of his movies.  Wasn't too crazy about his series Paranoia Agent, though.  But since he died, we won't get to see anymore of his beautiful work.  T_T

 

I also enjoy Mamoru Hosada's films.  He made Summer Wars and The Girl Who Leapt Through Time.  I'd really love to see more of his work in the future!

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Tchula    16

So I watched Makoto Shinkai's Garden of Words last night.  I enjoyed the story about a teenager and older woman who are struggling to find their paths in life.  The tone is understated, with much of the action having to do with the mental and emotional states of the characters, but the pacing reasonably moves the plot, unlike with The Place Promised in Our Early Days, which spent 15 seconds staring at a boring watercolor background painting at one point.  Of course, Garden is much shorter, only about 50 minutes or so, which was the right amount of time for the plot and background of the two main characters to unfold.  It's a hopeful story at the end, which is also nice.  One of the better anime to come out this year, for sure.

 

Now I have to find 5 Centimeters Per Second so I can watch it.

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michelle    51

Garden of Words just arrived at the store, but is still at the store. I was curious about that one, as it's supposed to much more in keeping with the anime/story choices he generally makes. I haven't watched 5 centimeters; I've read the manga and I'm not sure I want to watch it. I didn't hate the manga, but found it exceptionally painful. I often find painful the things I consider largely self-inflicted, even if they're familiar and easily recognizeable; it makes me want to smack people >.>

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Tchula    16

I know what you mean.  I understand 5 cm is about a long-distance relationship, which is always tough.  Dave and I dated long-distance for 4 years while I was away at optometry school, but fortunately, he had a good job and could afford airfare and phone calls.  Plus, our families lived in the same town, so we always saw each other at holiday breaks.  But I would say it's a very great strain that most relationships wouldn't survive, that's for sure.  ;-)

 

I've heard the ending of 5 cm is sad, but realistic.  I don't know if I'll like it, but I'm trying to get a feel for Shinkai's work.  So far he's 1 for 2 with me.

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